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CIRCLE

All research at Flamingo Land is co-ordinated through CIRCLE (the Collaboration for Integrated Research, Conservation and Learning), a collaboration with the University of York Environment Department.

The aim of CIRCLE is to carry out ground-breaking research that will go to the conservation of wild animals and places. We aim to get the results out in an accessible, interesting and fun way. The Flamingo Land Research Plan outlines a commitment to scientific research in all areas of the park’s activities, including enclosure design, animal behaviour, welfare, conservation, education and environmental sustainability.

CIRCLE has a growing team of researchers with expertise in biodiversity conservation, animal behaviour and education science. CIRCLE also offers highly competitive annual internships, providing early-career researchers with training in research methods, and an opportunity to design and carry out their own scientific study.

Tropical Forest Conservation

The longest-running CIRCLE research has focussed on tropical forests, through Flamingo Land’s Udzungwa Forest Project in Tanzania (East Africa). CIRCLE research is investigating how plant and animal species can be used for indicating forest health, while also testing methods for monitoring and managing conservation projects. Much of the research is focussed around primates, trees, and human livelihoods.

Zoo Exhibit Design

CIRCLE is developing methods for the evaluation and design of zoo exhibits. A prime example of this research is the design of Flamingo Land’s Penguin Coast. The Humboldt penguin occurs along the west coast of South America. Due to overfishing and climate change, their numbers have decreased over the last 30 years. CIRCLE research has determined the key enclosure design features for encouraging space-use, exercise and natural behaviour. Thanks to a huge pool and large colony size, the Flamingo Land penguins are now breeding and swimming more than ever before. The research continues...

Animal Diet

Nutrition plays a crucial role in the well being of an animal. The health, behaviour and ability to reproduce of an animal are all influenced by diet. CIRCLE researchers are undertaking a thorough review of the diets fed to every species of animal at Flamingo Land. Each diet will be assessed in terms of its nutritional content and energy. Zoo nutrition is an area of research that is rapidly growing and CIRCLE aims to contribute significantly to this important field.

Zoo Education

There are many ways that zoos attempt to get information on animals and their conservation across to their visitors, but there are few studies that have researched the best techniques. One key question for zoos is whether signs are effective at getting information across to visitors. Ongoing data collection by CIRCLE researchers is determining the rate at which visitors observe signs and how this is affected by graphic design and external influences such as animal activity.

Native Wildlife

Human impacts on the UK landscape have posed serious threats to British biodiversity and native wildlife. The 375 acre site at Flamingo Land has various areas of land set aside for conservation of native wildlife. This allows CIRCLE researchers to undertake a variety of projects aimed at supporting, monitoring and improving the native biodiversity of the site. This work includes the development of the Flamingo Land Biodiversity Action Plan. CIRCLE research activities include quantifying the carbon storage of the park’s trees and woodlands as a means to understanding how the carbon storage of the park compares to its emissions. Other projects include the planting of areas of woodlands and the development of a Sustainability Action Plan.

The Role of the Modern Zoo

Zoos have changed significantly over the last few decades, becoming centres of conservation, research and education. However, there are distinct differences between the quality and quantity of work done by individual zoos in these areas. CIRCLE research is investigating the involvement of zoos in conservation and research, as well as the factors that affect the quantity and quality of their research and conservation projects. It is hoped that this research can be used to help improve the contribution made by zoos to scientific research and the conservation of biodiversity.

Your Research Projects

Links to local research and educational institutions have also continued through projects carried out at Flamingo Land by external researchers. In the past these have included Askham Bryan College, the Food and Environment Research Agency, the University of York, Bishop Burton College and Leeds City College. Our long-term partners at Askham Bryan College regularly send students to carry out their undergraduate research projects, mostly related to animal welfare and behaviour. All external researchers are asked to present their research on completion, so that it can be incorporated into our system of long-term monitoring and animal management.

We can offer scientific advice and support to researchers and students wishing to carry out their research projects in the park. Anyone interested in carrying out a research project at Flamingo Land can submit their application using a form available by e-mail from This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or downloadable as a PDF file.

Please submit completed and signed forms to Dr. Andrew R. Marshall, Director of Conservation Science, Flamingo Land, Kirby Misperton, Malton, North Yorkshire.